Blog :: 01-2017

What Millennial Home Buyers Are Looking For

open kitchen

When I moved to this area, close to 30 years ago, it was all about the detail. Whether a home was big or small, most of us were looking for craftsmanship -- a house with good bones. And this area is brimming with them!

But this generation of buyer isn’t looking for the same things most sellers were looking for when we purchased our houses decades ago. So, if you’re a seller who is considering doing some work before listing this season, you can really increase your home’s “appeal” by paying attention to what today’s buyers care about most.

If you’re going to renovate, open spaces are more desirable than lots of smaller rooms. For example, an open kitchen is a big draw. But it doesn’t need to be a big, fancy kitchen! Millennials seem to prefer cleaner lines and more light over fussy architectural details. Bigger windows, not bigger moldings!

In fact, it doesn’t have to be a big house at all. Millennials would rather have a home office than a formal dining room. They're drawn to things like energy efficiency, low VOC paint, smart tech accoutrements (WiFi-enabled lights, thermostats, locks, and garage doors). And, need I say it – walkability!

Also, the lower the maintenance, the better. Examples would be Hardie Board siding vs. wood clapboard exteriors, or Trex for decking over wood. This crop of buyers want to spend their weekends entertaining friends, not staining the deck.

I’ve been helping sellers prep their homes for years. I have a background in architecture and a passion for construction details. If you want to get ready for market, I’m delighted to partner with you in any way you need. 

And if you’re looking for a home in a great, walkable suburb, I can help you turn whatever you find into the home of your dreams!

 

 

Hygge - You Know It When You Feel It

Living RoomPractically every time I open a magazine or click online these days, I am confronted with hygge. And my first thought is: Finally, someone is speaking my language!

Hygge is a Danish word that's started getting a lot more airplay lately, especially as winter comes upon us. Pronounced hue gah or hoog uh, it’s often translated as a kind of soothing coziness that, for Danes, is such a collectively held ideal it’s as if the concept is woven into their very being. I know this first-hand, as my mother was born and raised in Denmark. As a result, I grew up with the notion of hygge all around me.

There were some things my mother never quite “got” about living in the States – like American sandwiches. For example, she’d make PB&Js on rye bread. Or worse, she’d make peanut butter, butter, and jelly sandwiches! (Danes put butter on every piece of bread, regardless of what else is going to be added.)

But she did "get" hygge and, genetically, so did I.

The loveliness of hygge does not just revolve around warm fires and soft blankets – though that’s often how home design magazines illustrate the concept. It’s also tied to the profound goodness of being with people who nourish you. The deep pleasure and comfort that comes from hunkering down with the someone (or someones) you love.

I have always attempted to create a sense of hygge in the homes I’m selling. Not only because it makes buyers feel good when they tour the house, but also because it’s an idea that I feel so personally committed to. It’s even one of the reasons that I decided to make my home here. Montclair itself feels hygge to me.

Our clothing shops are hygge. Our yoga studios are hygge. Even our tattoo parlor feels hygge.

When helping people find their "right home," hygge is always a feeling I try to help someone identify (although I rarely ever call it that!). That space where they can truly sink into contentment. Their happy place.